Tag Archives: Red Lion High School

Seniors Organize Romp in the Boondocks as a Makeshift Prom

Shana Carey

Opinions Editor and Marketing Editor

“Cancelled due to COVID” is a phrase not so uncommon to hear nowadays. The senior class of 2021 experienced this first hand when administration officially cancelled prom. 

“Basically, we’ve known all year that if things didn’t change,” Executive Council Adviser Mrs. Rachel Curry said, “traditional prom wasn’t an option.” 

The Senior Executive Council originally also planned a class trip to Washington, D.C.. Since the museums and National Zoo are closed, school officials also cancelled this trip. 

“I was cautiously optimistic that it wouldn’t happen, but we kind of knew it (senior activities) was ending,” Mrs. Curry said, “That’s completely out of our control.”

Principal Mr. Mark Shue said that Red Lion is following all guidelines put out by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and are allowed to have some after school events but not prom out of concern that gatherings could be a super-spreader events for COVID-19 that “Goal number one is to keep school open,” Mr. Shue said. 

The Executive Council’s work raising money the past four years will not go to waste, however.

 “There’s a survey out there that we’re waiting for results on about whether they want an after school activity,” Mrs. Curry said. 

If the survey indicates that over half the senior class wants this event, Executive Council plans to move forward with the idea. This would be an after-school outdoor activity including food-trucks and yard games. 

“We are waiting to see if anyone is interested in it,” Mrs. Curry said. “It will be something similar to what happened with homecoming.”

Mr. Shue says that there has not been much interest in this event from the Google Form Mrs. Curry sent to the senior class. 

If this end of year senior celebration does not occur, Executive Council will purchase a gift for each senior. “I would like to have the gift be something that would be meaningful to the students,” Mrs. Curry said. 

To celebrate their graduation, many seniors are attempting to have somewhat normal end of year celebrations in lieu of the prom. A group of seniors organized a makeshift prom called Romp on the Boondocks, a non-school sanctioned event and anagram for prom. 

“It has been a very dim year for everyone,” Executive Council member and makeshift prom organizer Madison Daugherty said. “So, we decided to plan our own.”

The cancellation of prom came as a surprise to Thea Hennessy. “I was kind of excited for maybe an outdoor kind of thing, like they were talking about,” Hennessy said. “So it kind of blowed that they did cancel it, but I understand why of course.”

However, many students anticipated that administration would cancel prom. “I was disappointed,” Braden Reese de Leon said. “But it was expected.”

“It is a large venue with lots of outdoor space so we can spread out,” Daugherty said. “It also allows us to include other things that you usually would not have at prom, like a bonfire.” 

The large outdoor venue also encourages social distancing and air ventilation. Adult chaperones will enforce COVID-19 precautions such as mask wearing and social distancing.            All students attending must present a COVID-19 waiver in order to be allowed into Romp. 

 “We do want this to be a safe event,” Daugherty said. “We will have additional precautions set in place such as temperature checks and plenty of hand sanitizer.”

Many students are still concerned about the COVID-19 precautions at Romp. “I definitely am really scared about that,” attendee Hennessy said.  “I don’t think it’s going to be 100% safe.” 

Romp’s planners set the date for May 22, so many are concerned about a potential COVID-19 outbreak before graduation. 

“I hope that everybody’s really careful and thoughtful because, if it happens close enough to graduation and there’s any sort of COVID spread,” Mrs. Curry said, “there will be students in quarantine or school will be shut down before graduation.”

Daugherty told The Leonid that Romp will follow all of the governor’s mandates. Since COVID-19 is highly contagious, the seniors planning Romp are aware that many students will not attend in order to reduce their exposure to the virus. 

“We get it. Prom is not everyone’s cup of tea,” Daugherty said. “We are expecting upwards of 100 students or so. But we would love to have way more than that.”

Thea Hennessy, who is planning to attend Romp in the Boondocks, is apprehensive about contracting COVID-19.

 “Honestly, that’s why I’m really on the fence about going,” Hennesy said. “On the one hand, I want to have a good time with my senior year but on the other hand, I definitely want to be safe.”

Braden Reese de Leon does not plan to attend Romp, but she says, “I think it’ll be fine as long as they take those precautions.”

In order to raise money for Romp, Madison Daugherty and Madisson Shellenberger organized a fundraiser on GoFundMe. This money helps cover the cost of the venue, DJ, food, and decor. 

“Our vision for this event is more lowkey and relaxed, so there is no formal ticket process,” Daugherty said. “Any of our council members will be more than accommodating to get a ticket to any senior who reaches out.”

Romp is more casual because it is planned by students rather than the Executive Council. “It is not a school-sanctioned event,” Daugherty said, “so it is 100% student-planned.” 

Many people are concerned about the behavior of attendees to Romp. “I feel like they’d be just much more reckless because it’s not associated with the school,”  de Leon said. 

Members of the community will chaperone the event. “Though this is not school sanctioned, we expect behavior as if it were,” Daugherty said. “We expect nothing less than respectful behavior.

“Our biggest motivation for planning this event,” Daugherty said, ”is to give our seniors a sense of normalcy before going off to college or into the workforce.” 

Hennessy intends to go to Romp with a small group of friends before graduating. On the other hand, de Leon will not attend Romp because she wants to have a small get together rather than a large party. 

“I don’t want to go because I feel like my friends probably wouldn’t go either,” de Leon said, “and I’d rather have a small gathering of friends than try to have a makeshift prom outside of school.” 

“Our goal is to host one last hoorah before saying goodbye to our classmates,” Daugherty said. 

Administration fears a potential outbreak from Romp in the Boondocks. “We do not support a large gathering of students that could potentially lead to a COVID outbreak that could close the High School,” Mr. Shue said, “Please think before you act.” 

Hiking taught me to be more environmentally conscious

Shana Carey

Opinions Editor and Marketing Editor

If there’s one thing that the pandemic taught me, it’s that I am not the kind of person who can be cooped up in a room all day. 

When Governor Wolfe established the first set of quarantine restrictions, I eventually grew tired of staring at my bedroom walls, and it became apparent that I had to do something for my own sanity. 

So what do you do when you have a strong desire to leave your bed and get off TikTok, but a pandemic is stopping you from doing so? For me, the answer was hiking. 

I can proudly say that I walked nearly every trail in York County within the matter of one month. Quarantine wasn’t so bad because I was constantly moving and experiencing new places. 

This newfound love of the outdoors came with a price, though. I now see the mistreatment of our environment as an increasingly important problem. 

I first noticed how prominent litter is in the modern world when I was attempting to get a bird’s nest out of my dryer shaft. Apprehensive that I would see an innocent bird carcass, I peaked down the tube to find something far worse. 

A weak-looking nest held together with a long green string of plastic stared right back at me. 

Not only did human development force this bird to use a dryer shaft as a sanctuary, but the bird  was also reduced to constructing a home made of litter.

At this moment, I realized that waste directly affects the animals living in our environment right now. 

People are so desensitized to pollution because it does not immediately affect them. It’s easy to throw a paper bag on the ground and never see it again because ittering doesn’t instantly hurt litterers. 

But it does directly influence this generation of mammals while leaving long term negative effects on the sanctity of our planet. 

With a world that is covered in concrete, it’s easy to feel pretty isolated from the natural world. For this reason, littering and depletion of natural resources seem like distant problems that will never affect us. 

Environmental issues affect everyone.

Next time, you are on a walk around Red Lion, look around. 

On my 0.125 mile walk from the parking lot into the school, I saw nine pieces of garbage. Of those nine pieces of garbage, five were disposable masks, one was a half-full Fanta bottle, there were two disposable forks, and a plastic bag entrapped by a tree’s grasp. 

When you aren’t looking for it, a plastic bag trapped in a tree branch isn’t that incredible to look at. The sad thing is, it isn’t that unordinary either. 

According to the Department of Environmental Protection, an estimated 502 million pieces of litter scatter Pennsylvania roads. 

This explains why I am met with several new pieces of garbage on the ground each time I go outside. 

Now that I’m an avid hiker, every time I see a piece of garbage on the ground, it feels like a personal attack.

Problems fill the world to the brink, but this one resonates with me because humans are doing it to themselves. We are knowingly depleting our natural resources and harming our environment but continue to make few efforts to fix the problem.

So what should we do? Boycotting big corporations or passing Congressional laws are all really great ideas, but they seem like radical solutions. The only way to improve this whopping environmental problem is if every single person sacrifices a little convenience in their lives.

This means carpooling to school, turning off unnecessary lights, throwing trash in the appropriate areas, conserving your water intake, recycling, and even going to thrift stores. 

I recently made a vow to purchase all of my clothes from thrift stores in order to reduce the amount of clothing in landfills. 

Many people don’t know that manufacturing new clothing uses a tremendous amount of energy and water. However, thrifting is a useful tool to conserve natural resources and reduce water intake. Not to mention, the clothes are super cute and cheap.

Not only do I enjoy thrifting, but I also started a garden in order to avoid pesticide-infested veggies. Making this environmentally conscious choice has helped me to stimulate growth in my backyard and create a sanctuary for snails, caterpillars, and other little creatures. 

Everyday environmental actions allow me to reduce my carbon footprint. Making the decision to be environmentally conscious didn’t  inconvenience me that much, but it will have lasting positive effects on the environment. 

If everyone makes a small change in their life to be more environmentally conscious, then this giant environmental crisis will slowly diminish. 

The thing is – I want to enjoy hiking throughout my adulthood. I want to go swimming in a lake that isn’t heavily polluted. I want to walk 0.125 miles without seeing a piece of garbage. 

And it all starts by putting litter in its place.