Tag Archives: featured

Red Lion hosts second annual Rumble in the Jungle

Lock Haven and Arizona State wrestlers grapple during the 2018 Rumble in the Jungle.

Lock Haven and Naval Academy wrestling teams square off in a regular season match

By Julia Beiler, Sports editor

Lock Haven returns to Red Lion this Friday for another year of Rumble in the Jungle. This year they take on a new opponent, the Naval Academy. 

The second annual Rumble in the Jungle will kick off Friday, Dec. 13 at 7 p.m. in the Fitzkee Center at Red Lion Senior High School. This NCAA Division I wrestling match is a huge event for Red Lion. 

Many days of hard work are being put into getting ready for Friday night’s wrestling match. With an event so large, greater steps are being taken to make this event stand out and be successful. 

Last year’s event brought lots of attention to Red Lion, as the rivalry match between Lock Haven and Arizona State brought in many spectators from all over. Local fans also came to see Kennard Dale graduate Chance Marstellar compete. 

High School Biology teacher Mr. Brad Lloyd, a former wrestler for Lock Haven University, holds the title of an all-time winningest wrestler with 146 wins and was a three-time All-American top eight in the country, second and third in the country offered commentary. He is excited to see his alma mater’s team come to Red Lion.

“What makes Lock Haven appealing to be involved is that most people on the team are from this state,” Mr. Lloyd said.

Many graduates from PIAA District III are on both the Naval Academy and Lock Haven University teams. That makes the matchups between the two teams unique within the players. 

From Lock Haven, senior Kyle Shoop is a returning All-American wrestler and is currently ranked 12th in the nation. Lock Haven also has senior Alex Klucker, who is ranked 16th in the country. Shoop went to Boiling Springs and Klucker is from East Pennsboro, both from PIAA District 3. Senior Jared Siegrist is also from Pennsylvania, Siegrist is a graduate from Manheim Central.

From the Naval Academy, freshman Jacob Koser is from Pennsylvania coming from Northern York.

Although, as successful as it was last year, it is not expected to be the same turn out again. 

“I don’t think it will be as large as last year,” Red Lion athletic director Arnold Fritzius said. “Partly because of the matchup, partly because it is earlier in the year, and partly because of the annual Army-Navy football game happening this Saturday.” 

This is only the second year of this event, but according to Fritzius, this event will be something that happens annually. “We already have one team committed to coming next year,” Fritzius said. 


Tickets range in price from $10 to $125 and can be purchased here.

Disney takes its turn with a streaming site

By Ryelee Stone

Opinions Editor

Streaming services provide different shows and movies that can appeal to everyone at the touch of their fingertips. I have found a streaming service that brings the magic of my favorite childhood memories to life.

A new streaming service that was recently released is Disney Plus. This streaming service provides shows and movies from Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, and National Geographic.

Disney Plus was released to the public on Nov. 12, 2019. The founder of this streaming site is Disney, and the CEO, Bob Iger, was the one who announced the launch.

This streaming site is Disney’s way of participating in the world of online streaming shows and movies. Disney can bring in even more revenue while providing their fans access to their favorite shows and movies.

According to Disney Plus’ website, the cost of a subscription is more affordable than other services at a price of $6.99 per month, along with a seven-day free trial to allow people to test out the streaming service. There is even a discount of paying $69.99 per year that would save buyers around $13.

After a simple signing-up process, the main menu for the site is clean and easy to maneuver through. There is a search button like any other streaming site, but the shows and movies are divided into different categories.

There are the standard streaming categories to choose from, including the Recommended for You, Continue Watching, What’s Trending, and more. What is special to Disney Plus is that there are sections to pick selections from only Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, or National Geographic.

Around the time the site was launched, the continue watching section disappeared on the home screen. Disney fixed this issue two weeks after the launch, showing that their team is responsive to problems. 

Something for parents to be aware of is that when you open the Disney Plus app after setting up an account, you can pick whichever profile you want to get into. There’s hardly any challenge to unlocking the parent accounts and there’s not a strong child lock, but time will tell if this needs to be fixed.

A larger selection of shows and movies are available to choose from compared to other sites and R-rated movies are not provided. Disney Plus still lived up to the hype it received because of the quality of the shows and movies it provides.

I have watched classic childhood movies and shows from this site that brought nostalgic feelings while watching them. I have also binge-watched the television show “Boy Meets World,” and watching shows and movies on this streaming site feels normal.

Shows and movies that I watched with my family when I was younger are on this site, and it is an amazing feeling to revisit those simpler times. “Toy Story,” “The Incredibles,” and “Monster’s Inc.” are all the movies that I have watched recently with my whole family because we have a Disney plus account.

Disney Plus has made a great impression on me and I plan on continuing to use this streaming service for as long as I can. Netflix does not have access to all of the shows and movies that Disney Plus has, so it is a great service that provides new content.

The overall impression that I have about Disney Plus is that it’s an amazing streaming site that provides options that everyone can enjoy. If someone is curious about trying it out, they should because it is reasonably priced and is an overall smooth experience to use.

Red Lion boots up for military night to raise awareness and funds for Jr. ROTC program

Sophomore Anthony Barkus checks out a howitzer parked outside of Horn Field. Photo by Genevieve Turner

By Julia Beiler

Sports editor

The Army National Guard, the Army, the Navy, and the Air National Guard stood on the streets of Red Lion outside the gates of Horn Field Oct. 25.

A howitzer pointed off into the distance of the town.  An Army truck idled on Horace Mann Avenue near a dozen military men in their uniforms. This was not a combat situation, but a tailgate before Friday night’s football game outside of Horn Field.

This tailgate was not your typical barbeque and family hangout. The different branches had their own special setups with yard games and informational flyers for students. Each branch was sharing the benefits of joining the military and how a student could benefit from joining. 

Not only was this event informational, but the main goal of the event was also to promote interest in and raise money for the Jr. Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program that Red Lion is trying to draw to the school. 

The Jr. ROTC program is a character development program that in placed in public or private schools throughout the country. Students who are involved in the program gain different skills and knowledge. 

 “Leadership, self-discipline, undefinable grit, and critical thinking,” Rickard said. All those traits are something that students can get from having this program within the school. 

Students who have already enlisted in the military worked at the booths that night, including senior Logan Axe.

“The night seemed to be successful,” Axe said. “Lots of students were stopping by before the game.”

The idea of bringing a  Jr. ROTC program to Red Lion has been around for just about two years, according to Bill Rickard. The Air Force was the only branch of the military that showed interest in placing this program into Red Lion. Friday night’s tailgate was a way of promoting the program and fundraising for it. 

Although it has taken a long time to get to this point, there are still many obstacles before this program can be placed into the school. One of these obstacles being the Air Force was the only branch of the military that showed interest in placing this program into Red Lion. 

“We will be having a site visit in April,” Rickard said. “And we will see what happens from there.”

An estimated $250,000 is the starting budget to get the program up and running. Assistant principal Bill Rickard said that the expense is worth it.

Having this event on Friday gained promotion and fundraising for the Jr. ROTC program that might go into Red Lion Area Senior High School. As successful as this tailgate was, there was much more behind corn hole and hanging out. This tailgate had the promotion of something that may impact Red Lion for years to come.

Voice of Democracy winners announced

Staff Reports

Four sophomore English 2 students won awards Tuesday for their “Voice of Democracy” essays.

Sweeping first through fourth places are Nicholas Hinton, Francesca Rizzo, Christopher Danner, and Bryn Hughes respectively.

Hinton and Rizzo’s essays will move on to the district level of competition.

Co-chairs of the contest were on hand to deliver the certificates. Daryl Webb, Senior Vice Commander and his wife Kathryn Tate, a life member of Red Lion Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1446, expressed their pride in the work the students did to complete the essay.

“We’re so proud of the your accomplishment and your hard work,” Tate said.

Daryl Webb, Nicholas Hinton, Francesca Rizzo, Christopher Danner, Bryn Hughes and Kathryn Tate.

Red Lion Football: Team bonds like FAMILY in Fall 2019

By Ryelee Stone

Editor

The lights were brightly shining, the commentator’s voice was booming, and spectators of all ages were beginning to form a crowd for a Friday night football game.

The highly anticipated senior night football game between Red Lion and Dallastown on Friday, Oct. 25. was the last game of the 2019 football season, so the pressure was on the Lions to win. 

It was 14-7 going into halftime.  Dallastown got the ball back and scored on their first possession of the second half.  The Wildcats scored again and went into the fourth quarter with a 21-20 lead .

The Lions would get a few defensive stops and score one last time to take the lead 28-21, and they didn’t look back.

“The best part of the game was beating Dallastown on senior night on our home field in front of a big crowd,” said cornerback and captain Kobe Martin. “The key was everyone working together as a team, and everyone doing their assignments.”

“Ending the year beating Dallastown is always a success,” head coach Jesse Shay said. “Of course we wanted to make the playoffs, but that is not the only measure of success.” 

Even though the Lions won their last game, the overall record for the season was 6-4. 

Red Lion was undefeated for the first part of the season with the hopes that  their fate would be as good as last year’s record when the team advanced to the playoffs.  

The blowout game against Central York that ended with a score of 58-7 changed that momentum.

Red Lion’s student section was quiet and sat down during the middle of the game, while some spectators left early. 

“The game was mostly dull,” junior Mauriana Lower said. “There just wasn’t much happening that the student section could be excited about.”

The football team was not able to connect their passes, which ultimately hurt them in the end.

“We need to fix what’s wrong and move forward,” coach Shay said in his post-game speech. “Let it sting. Let this one sting.”

The Red Lion vs. Central York football game was a loss, but the turning point of the season was the SouthWestern game. 

“We didn’t execute well,” senior captain Kobe Martin said. “It seemed like people were down the whole time and we couldn’t get anything going.”

This loss may have discouraged the team and affected how they played from that point on. The South Western game was an opportunity for the Lions to prove themselves, but they lost the game 17-14.

The Lions had one more chance to redeem themselves on their Homecoming game against New Oxford. They lost with a score of 27-0 on Oct. 11.

“All hope was lost,” said wide receiver Randy Fizer. “You’re supposed to win your homecoming game, but we didn’t.” 

There were more losses throughout the season. On Oct. 4, Red Lion lost to William Penn 18-0 at their field. There were still wins that the team could be proud of during the season.

The Lions topped the Bobcats with a score of 41-28 on Sept. 27 at Horn field. Red Lion also won at Spring Grove on Oct. 18 with a score of 26-13.

“I think overall the boys played well together and really embraced the ‘FAMILY’ motto this year,” football manager Starr Sandt said. “They played for each other, with each other even though the outcome was not what they had hoped for.”

Red Lion’s football team had to overcome many injuries from starting players. During this time, the seniors continued to lead the team while some underclassmen had to fill in certain roles.

Even though the Lions did not have a perfect season and did not make the playoffs, the team bonded together. 

“When you lose a football game, it’s devastating,” coach Shay said. “But you have a whole team to lean on to get through that feeling.”

Classes join competition to stock local food bank

“Bring in cans because it’s for a good cause!”

Delaney Jess, Student Council Canned Food Drive Chair

By Margaux Rentzel

Multimedia editor

Student council is gearing up for their annual canned food drive November 18-22. It will be another competition between the classes, and the winning class will win $250 and 50 class cup points.

Collected items will go to the Grace Lutheran Food Bank in Red Lion. 

“It is directly affecting our community,” head of the drive committee for student council, Delaney Jess said, “and we try to help them out as much as we can.”

Students in grades 9-12 can bring in canned food items to be a part of the competition as well as give to their community. 

“I hope it has as much momentum behind it as it did last year,” Jess said, “because we collected around 10,000 things to donate.” 

In April of 2019, the student-council-run canned food drive implemented an incentive to get people to participate. “[In previous years] when we didn’t have the competition,” Jess said, “we only had probably a couple of hundred cans.”  

In the Spring 2019 drive, the classes competed against each other for the class that brought in the most cans. The winner would receive $500 toward their graduating class’s executive council. 

According to Student Council, last year the juniors were in the lead during the whole week. Until, on Friday, the seniors and sophomores arose in the competition. The classes started bringing ramen because each ramen packet counted as one “can”. 

The seniors saw their placement on Friday morning and used their class money to leave during the school day and go buy more items for the drive before everything was counted, according to a representative from student council

The controversy caused the seniors to become disqualified and the sophomores ended up winning. Jess was disappointed in the outcome. 

“The idea that it’s going to families in our community was lost in the sense of competition.”

“Now that we know the way that it went and we have the experience,” Jess said. “We just implemented some new rules so that way it’s more fair and a friendlier competition.” 

This November the new rules are gravy packets do not count; ramen packets count as one quarter of a can; and leaving school to go buy cans is prohibited. 

“Bring in cans because it’s going to a good cause.”  Jess said. “May the best class win!” 

Mini-THON brings in new leadership

Student section rowdies sport their Mini-THON white-out apparel for the Central football game.

By Margaux Rentzel

Social Media editor                    

For the 2019 school year, Ms. Jennifer Geiselman was brought in as an adviser, along with Ms. Beyer, a previous adviser, for the Mini-THON club. Gieselman has replaced Mr. Small as the Mini-THON adviser. 

Geiselman was asked last year by some of the Mini-THON committee members and student directors if they would be their adviser for the upcoming school year. “The students came to me at the end of last year,” Geiselman said, “and asked if I would be their adviser.” 

Geiselman is not new to Mini-THON. While she was a student at Red Lion, she participated in Mini-THON, which compelled her to be the advisor this year. “When I was in high school we had the chance to attend THON,” Gieslman said, “and it was a great experience.” 

THON is the event Penn State hosts which is the 48-hour event to raise money for childhood cancer. Red Lion has adopted the organization by holding their own 12-hour Mini-THON event in the spring of each school year. 

The Mini-THON committee members had to get used to the new leadership. “We were a little nervous about changing leadership because we were worried that the adjustment would put a lot of our fall fundraisers on hold,” sophomore Mini-THON adviser, Anna Heilman said, “but the transition went really well and we are excited for this upcoming year.” 

Under Gieslman’s leadership, Mini-THON has sold t-shirts for the white-out football game. “So far, to fundraise, we have done the whiteout football game,” Heilman said, “where we sold t-shirts as apparel for the game and collected donations.”

Mini-THON plans fundraisers and events all year to raise money for the big event in April. “This year Mini-THON has a bunch of new and exciting fundraisers for everyone to participate in,” Heilman said. “We are trying to focus this year on getting a lot of fundraisers that are aimed towards the students.” 

Mini-THON plans to host a Spook-a-THON on October 19. “More upcoming events we have are gift-wrapping in December, a spaghetti dinner in February,” Heilman said, “and Mini-THON in the spring!”

This year’s Mini-THON is in honor of Aaron Weiss, who lost the fight to cancer in 2014. Aaron would have been a senior this year. “We hoped that by honoring Aaron, the senior class would get excited and want to participate,” Heilman said, “because a lot of them knew Aaron or knew of him.”  

“Our overall Mini-THON fundraising goal this year,” Mini-THON director, Emily Hornberger said, “is over $50,000 dollars.” 

The money that Mini-THON fundraises goes directly to the Four Diamond fund. “It’s in honor of Aaron,” Gieselman said, “but it goes to the Four Diamonds Fund and they distribute it.”  

Mini-THON’s new leadership does not stop their passion for the cause. “New leadership under Ms. Gieselman is going really well,” Heilman said.

Boys basketball finishes season with young team

By Brody Patmore

Sports Editor

Red Lion boys basketball season started early December with a 58-40 win against Mifflin County. Just under two months later the season came to an end Wednesday, Feb. 5 as the Lions fell to Dallastown by a final score of 56-46.

The teams season ended with a 10-12 overall record and 4-10 in YAIAA Division I play.

The team scored a total of 1,185 points through their 22 games averaging just under 54 points a game. On the defensive side they gave up 1,144 points averaging exactly 52 points against per game. Head coach Steven Schmehl completed his 12th year of coaching. “I felt like we were very competitive in each and every game and not far away from being a playoff team” said Schmehl.

The future for the team has some good potential. Next year the team will return three starters that will all be juniors. “We will return four of our top six scorers and anticipate being very competitive in the next couple seasons.” said Schmehl.

“We need to shoot the ball better and take care or it better next year” said Schmehl on what the team needs to improve. As for the teams strengths, Schmehl felt toughness was a trait the team carried through the whole season.

A true testimony of that toughness came on Jan 22 when the lions faced York High, the eventual county champions. Red Lion played one of their best games of the season lead by senior Phillip Douglass who had 30 points. They took the best team in the league to two overtime periods before losing by a final score of 79-69.

Douglass was one of the top scorers on the team and will be missed next season. “I’ll miss the free feeling I get when playing the game,” said Douglass, “When I’m in the zone I feel like everything slows done, I have no care in the world but playing with all my effort.”