Category Archives: Opinon

Hiking taught me to be more environmentally conscious

Shana Carey

Opinions Editor and Marketing Editor

If there’s one thing that the pandemic taught me, it’s that I am not the kind of person who can be cooped up in a room all day. 

When Governor Wolfe established the first set of quarantine restrictions, I eventually grew tired of staring at my bedroom walls, and it became apparent that I had to do something for my own sanity. 

So what do you do when you have a strong desire to leave your bed and get off TikTok, but a pandemic is stopping you from doing so? For me, the answer was hiking. 

I can proudly say that I walked nearly every trail in York County within the matter of one month. Quarantine wasn’t so bad because I was constantly moving and experiencing new places. 

This newfound love of the outdoors came with a price, though. I now see the mistreatment of our environment as an increasingly important problem. 

I first noticed how prominent litter is in the modern world when I was attempting to get a bird’s nest out of my dryer shaft. Apprehensive that I would see an innocent bird carcass, I peaked down the tube to find something far worse. 

A weak-looking nest held together with a long green string of plastic stared right back at me. 

Not only did human development force this bird to use a dryer shaft as a sanctuary, but the bird  was also reduced to constructing a home made of litter.

At this moment, I realized that waste directly affects the animals living in our environment right now. 

People are so desensitized to pollution because it does not immediately affect them. It’s easy to throw a paper bag on the ground and never see it again because ittering doesn’t instantly hurt litterers. 

But it does directly influence this generation of mammals while leaving long term negative effects on the sanctity of our planet. 

With a world that is covered in concrete, it’s easy to feel pretty isolated from the natural world. For this reason, littering and depletion of natural resources seem like distant problems that will never affect us. 

Environmental issues affect everyone.

Next time, you are on a walk around Red Lion, look around. 

On my 0.125 mile walk from the parking lot into the school, I saw nine pieces of garbage. Of those nine pieces of garbage, five were disposable masks, one was a half-full Fanta bottle, there were two disposable forks, and a plastic bag entrapped by a tree’s grasp. 

When you aren’t looking for it, a plastic bag trapped in a tree branch isn’t that incredible to look at. The sad thing is, it isn’t that unordinary either. 

According to the Department of Environmental Protection, an estimated 502 million pieces of litter scatter Pennsylvania roads. 

This explains why I am met with several new pieces of garbage on the ground each time I go outside. 

Now that I’m an avid hiker, every time I see a piece of garbage on the ground, it feels like a personal attack.

Problems fill the world to the brink, but this one resonates with me because humans are doing it to themselves. We are knowingly depleting our natural resources and harming our environment but continue to make few efforts to fix the problem.

So what should we do? Boycotting big corporations or passing Congressional laws are all really great ideas, but they seem like radical solutions. The only way to improve this whopping environmental problem is if every single person sacrifices a little convenience in their lives.

This means carpooling to school, turning off unnecessary lights, throwing trash in the appropriate areas, conserving your water intake, recycling, and even going to thrift stores. 

I recently made a vow to purchase all of my clothes from thrift stores in order to reduce the amount of clothing in landfills. 

Many people don’t know that manufacturing new clothing uses a tremendous amount of energy and water. However, thrifting is a useful tool to conserve natural resources and reduce water intake. Not to mention, the clothes are super cute and cheap.

Not only do I enjoy thrifting, but I also started a garden in order to avoid pesticide-infested veggies. Making this environmentally conscious choice has helped me to stimulate growth in my backyard and create a sanctuary for snails, caterpillars, and other little creatures. 

Everyday environmental actions allow me to reduce my carbon footprint. Making the decision to be environmentally conscious didn’t  inconvenience me that much, but it will have lasting positive effects on the environment. 

If everyone makes a small change in their life to be more environmentally conscious, then this giant environmental crisis will slowly diminish. 

The thing is – I want to enjoy hiking throughout my adulthood. I want to go swimming in a lake that isn’t heavily polluted. I want to walk 0.125 miles without seeing a piece of garbage. 

And it all starts by putting litter in its place. 

Viewpoint: How the experience of quarantine affected my mental health

By: Laela Thibault

Guest Columnist

Mental health is a serious subject, but it should not be taboo. It is something that everyone deals with, and everyone’s feelings and emotions are completely valid. It tends to be difficult for individuals to come out and talk about their experiences or how they are feeling, but it could be therapeutic for some. 

Even coming out with your own experience could help someone else come out about their mental health as well. Therefore, I would like to share my personal experience. 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, quarantine played a significant role with my mental health. When COVID-19 became a peak issue, it was during my junior year of high school. 

During my junior year, my motivation was low, my sleep patterns were terrible, and my work was not getting done. I was continuously falling into bad habits when it came to school. My grades were getting worse, and I kept getting disappointed at myself. 

I communicated with people I was close to during the school year. I did this in order to be open about my feelings instead of just bottling them up. It was a whole different story when quarantine started though. My mental health was back on a decline.

Considering that my motivation was horrendous while I was in school, absolutely no schoolwork getting completed while I was at home. I felt like I became the worst version of myself, and being isolated with my own thoughts and feelings, I constantly put myself down. 

I started to not sleep at all and I was not taking care of myself like I knew I should.. I stayed in my room, in my bed, and barely spent time with my family. Based on how badly I procrastinated, I almost had to repeat my classes. Fortunately, with the help of my teachers, I was able to pass.

Quarantine during my junior year was a dark, dark period for me but in the end, I still made it through. 

In conclusion, I just want to make it clear that it does end up getting better. Now I am in my senior year, and I am genuinely happy and enjoying myself! 

You should not be ashamed of how you feel because your own feelings are valid and they matter. YOU matter and you can get through any struggle or challenge that comes your way. 

Speak about your own experiences when you are ready because it could help someone else. Opening up more discussion about mental health could make society take it more seriously because it is serious and needs to be talked about. 

Trying to fit in as the new kid

By George Keene                    

Staff Writer

First day of school at Red Lion Senior High school in Red Lion, Pennsylvania, on August 24, 2020. Photo taken by Susan Keene

“My name is George, and I’m new to Red Lion this year.”

I repeat the same line time and again, the only difference is the name of the school I am attending. The feeling of not knowing anybody and anything will never go away.

No matter how many times I am new, I get butterflies in my stomach and a feeling of discomfort and not belonging. I walk into school the first day knowing nothing and no one, hoping to make a friend or two, and not wanting to stick out. 

I have moved around my whole life. I was born in Dubai and have lived in 6 countries across 4 continents. I have attended 3 international schools in Egypt, Malaysia, and most recently, Kenya.

I have also attended 3 public schools ranging across the east coast of the United States and the experience is all but similar.

The experience of being a new student, however, is very different at an international school from a public school.

When I am a new student at an international school, which is an English speaking school overseas with an American curriculum, there are hundreds of other kids just like me, transient kids who are used to the feeling of being new and alone. This makes it easier for new students to fit in, because all the kids have had similar experiences. They know what it is like to be in my shoes.

The main reason as to why it’s easier for me to settle into an international school is because of sports and workshops. The international schools I have attended in my life have had fewer students than Red Lion, and it was easier to make the sports teams, and being on the sports teams helped me make friends.

At the beginning of every year, the schools would also hold new student workshops for all the new students where you could meet the other new students and some students who volunteered to show you around and help you out the first couple weeks. These little things helped me settle in and make friends. On top of that, it was easier to talk to people and relate to them because I had similar experiences as them so it was easier to fit in.

When I am a new student at a public school, nobody is like me. 

There are fewer new kids, and most of the kids have attended school in the same district their entire lives. They don’t know what it’s like to be me, the new kid. At public schools, the main reason it’s harder to settle in than at international schools is the fact that there aren’t the same opportunities to make friends.

The sports teams are harder to make because the level of play is higher and there aren’t any workshops or chances to meet the other new students. You’re thrown into a big pool of fish and have no idea where to go, who to talk to, and who anybody is. Most of the kids have been friends for a long time, because people move around less at public schools. I also am unable to relate to most of the students because we aren’t all that alike. I have seen things they have never seen, like the Pyramids in Egypt. 

As if being a new student isn’t hard enough, COVID-19 made it a whole lot harder. I have always been shy and it’s always been difficult for me to introduce myself to people. So, on top of that fear, I now have to worry about catching this highly infectious disease from my peers around me. In the middle of this mess, however, COVID-19 has given me the opportunity to connect with my old friends peers from all around the world through technology.  

I am a student of the world, even though I am physically located in Red Lion. Some people think that the more you move around and the more times you are a new student, that it gets easier, but it doesn’t.

The feeling of discomfort and not belonging never goes away, but I have learned to take these experiences and make an impact wherever I go, and to learn from those who are around me because their experiences are very different from mine. That’s how you grow and become a student of the world, not just by living across the world, but by meeting people who have and who haven’t.

Change is what makes your experiences as a new student different in international schools compared to public schools. International students understand change and are used to it, while public school students haven’t experienced enough change to feel any way about it and are not used to it. There is nothing wrong with that but that’s what makes our lives unique and difficult, and being a new student in a new country, a new state, a new town, is what makes me, me.

My journey to accept Sri Lanka and America as my home

By Amila Jayamaha

Guest Columnist

America is notorious for being considered a “melting pot.” It’s a country where everyone’s individualities get melted into one large label, “American.” This causes many immigrants to lose their sense of nationalism for their mother country, and makes it even harder for second generation immigrants to have a sense of patriotism for their parents’ home countries. 

I, like the common second generation immigrant, consider America to be my home and chose not to learn about my heritage as a Sinhalese person. However, after many years of discussion with my parents, and some trips to their homeland, I have a newfound appreciation for the country. This allowed me to come to the realization that I am able to consider both America and Sri Lanka to be my home. 

When I was younger my parents used to speak their native language in our house quite often, Sinhalese, and though I understood it well, I would never make any efforts to learn to speak it. I am to this day devastated with that fact. I realized how much I lost by choosing not to invest time in learning about my heritage when I first went to Sri Lanka at the age of 4.

 Throughout the 21 hour plane ride to the country, I was anticipating being extremely underwhelmed entering the country. I assumed all I would want to do would be to count the days till I got to go back home. 

After exiting the airport all of my senses were firing. I would smell the salt from the sea, feel the humid wind on my skin, taste the moisture in the air, and see and hear a bustling city in front of me. Needless to say, I was surprised by how excited I became when seeing the country for the first time. 

The drive to my grandparents home was the most fascinating and scary experience of my life. While I was able to look out the windows and see the large green mountain ranges where rice, tea, and other vegetables were growing. 

Driving in Sri Lanka is very scary, the yellow lines in the center of the road are a mere suggestion, and to drivers the speed limit is the minimum speed you should go. People race around the road overtaking and honking at one another, men herding cattle would suddenly go into the road causing a traffic jam. While I was terrified, I was also bursting with excitement for what else this country had to offer me. 

My first real outing in Sri Lanka led me to one of the many Buddhist temples scattered around the country. I was pleasantly surprised as to how interesting the history was at the temple. The large curved walls were painted with Buddha’s story of enlightenment and there were many statues of different monks and animals around the floors. 

However, what caught my eye the fastest was the 25 foot long sleeping Buddha statue made entirely out of gold, which I later found out was made over 1000 years ago. Hearing this story made me realize the historical value of Sri Lanka. After researching different aspects of Buddhism, I chose to convert to the religion. I had many supporters in the matter, because many of my family, including my mother are Buddhist.

 The next prominent trip I went on was climbing Sigiriya. This mountain stands over 1000 feet tall, and I had little to no support climbing up. While there are railings and stairs now, when I climbed the mountain, there were only steep rock paths that had no railings to catch you if you slipped. 

This added to my sense of adventure while in Sri Lanka, because while the trek was difficult, the view at the top of the mountain was amazing. Atop the mountain was the ruins of an old castle built by a Sri Lankan king who was afraid his brother, who he had pushed out to India, would come back to kill him. Thus, in his paranoia, he built the castle and created an irrigation system in the mountain that would allow him to flood the land in a 60 mile radius to keep invaders out. 

The stories this country had were so fascinating to my young brain, that it helped me learn to appreciate my culture. 

To this day, I continue going on annual summer trips to Sri Lanka to visit friends and family, and see different temples. I have begun learning to speak Sinhalese as well, so that I may someday be able to go to the country alone and experience a new sense of freedom in my motherland. 

After setting up a dual citizenship, I have finally accepted America and Sri Lanka to be my home and hope to embrace the culture that both countries offer. 

Attack On Titan: Breaking the wall of First Impressions

From Thriller to Commentary: How a series evolved into a display of the Human condition

By Max Vigue

Multimedia-Content Editor  

Hajime Isayama’s manga series later turned animated show in 2013 (directed by Tetsurō Araki, Masashi Koizuka, Jun Shishido, and Yūichirō Hayashi) Attack On Titan has accumulated a wide spectrum of popularity. 

 It made waves with a debut in the East and nearly became a classic comparable to Game of Thrones in the West, it streams on streaming services such as CrunchyRoll and Netflix.

Attack On Titan is a show that can capture the attention of mainstream American.  Season 4 will be adapting the later sections of the manga, developing beyond the initial premise. 

Although Wit Studio (April 7, 2013-July 1, 2019) has built up the reputation of releasing these breathtaking adaptations, Mappa (December 7-Present, February 2020), which is known for its mosaic animation, now has taken the reins for finishing this saga.
 
Despite the mixed feedback, audiences are becoming more accustomed to Mappa’s unique style of blending 2D animation with CGI. 

For a quick recap of the initial premise, Attack On Titan is set in a world where humanoid giants referred to as Titans roam the countryside of Paradis Island. 

In response the people of the island built walls to protect themselves from the Titans; Thus enduring over nearly over centuries of peace until one day, a large Titan, referred to as the Colossal Titan, broke down the first wall. 

With one of the walls, Wall Mira, broken down, the people of Paradis [sic] lost 70% of their territory. After retreating into Wall Rose, Eren Yeager (MC) swore revenge on the Titans to one day wipe them all out. Beyond the initial storyline, the show has evolved to become a much more complex narrative.
This series has always held a reputation for its stellar animation. Even after being taken under the wing of Mappa, it still maintains its aesthetic. For instance, The choreography of the action scenes throughout the course of the show have always been executed well. Each movement is animated smoothly, each shot is detailed and meticulously placed. When incorporated into the full sequence, an adrenaline-fueled experience is blasted on screen. 

Mappa has also added another layer of depth to the series by uzliting rotoscoping technology. Rotoscoping really plays into the series’ gritty aesthetic of realism, allowing dialogue-heavy episodes come off as intensely introspective.   

Attack On Titan, on its debut, was perceived as an action-packed roller coaster, showcasing a simple tale of man-eating beasts overtaking human civilization. But over time it has presented itself as a case study analyzing the human condition as a whole. 

The story makes the audience realize that the world does not function under a hero’s journey plot. Every single character has their own reasoning for why they set course on a certain path. 

All the conflicts are sparked due to difference in agendas, colliding with each other like atoms. No one will be willing to budge. Yet Isayama constructed the architecture of the story to make us feel empathy for all sides. 

Even characters that were considered antagonists have their backgrounds explored in depth, conveying a message that even antagonists are still just humans in this world.  
Protagonist Eren Yeager, throughout the course of the story comes to these realizations. At first he is hell-bent on wiping out everyone of one of the Titans ,seeing anyone who stands in his way as an enemy who is completely faceless. But the world forces him to evolve. 

The more he learns about the truth of the Titans, about what the world out the walls is really like, and that some of his allies were actually his enemies the whole time, his perspective evolves.  He is able to sympathize with his enemies and even conclude that they are the same people. He, however, comes to another realization: In this world you can’t stop out of pity or you’ll never be able to achieve your goals. 

So despite his broadened perspective, he knows that he can’t abandon his overall objective. At the end of the day, even though his enemies might be the same in terms of situation, pain, and upbringing he still pushes forward. He will have to take them out by any means in order to achieve his goals. 
Isayama’s once obscure dystopian action manga has evolved to become a commentary for the human condition in animated form. 

Despite still starting off as a series an individual could enjoy for its action,it has transformed into a very thought-provoking work that will make Attack On Titan stand out, regardless of the studio behind it or its specific adaptations.  

I would recommend this series to anyone who not just enjoys well-paced fight scenes, enjoys drama heavy plot, or introspective character arcs.

 All those factors are just a surplus in the larger scheme of this story. It’s the world building, compelling themes, thought-provoking story telling, tear-jerking moments and overall spirit of the show as a whole which makes Attack On Titan unique. 

This show is a must watch for anyone, regardless of demographic. It doesn’t matter if you enjoy anime as a medium or not, the quality makes Attack On Titan a must-watch. 
Artwork created and Distributed by MAPPA Studio

Manga written and illustrated by Hajime Isayama

Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research.

Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

The Leonid editors weigh in on flexible instruction snow days

Kaitlyn Resline

Editor-in-Chief

I have mixed feelings about snow flex days. While I appreciate the fact that we will no longer have to make up snow days and lose holidays, I mourn the loss of the snow days of my youth. Having a random day off to go play in the snow excites me more than staring at a computer.

However, I felt relieved that the school district announced the snow day in advance. This meant that I no longer had to wake up early only to get a delay call, and get ready only to find out school was cancelled. Knowing in advance adds to the benefit of not having to make up days.

The worst part about the flexible instruction days is the work. I find myself having a hard time focusing to get any of the assignments done. On top of those, I have to finish long term assignments for classes as well. With no separation of work in my day, I spend a lot of time trying to sit and focus. I like using Google Meets to see my classmates, but once they are over, I realize it is lunch time, and I still have not completed any work that is due. 

The idea of flexible instruction for snow days is beneficial, but I enjoy an old fashioned snow day and in person instruction much better. 


Max Vigue

Multimedia Content Editor

The online school day is a relatively unexplored ocean of opportunities. However, this opens the flood gates to a whole new tidal wave of issues.  

The idea of an online school day, from what I have seen, is very unpopular with students. I yearn for the idle feeling of a snow day, which may now become a relic of a much radically different time. A snow day jumps out like a surprise, but a welcome one, as it is accompanied by a sensation of coziness and relaxation without departing from where you reside. A snow day turns a day out of the long year into an escapist fantasy, giving the mind a period of hibernation, allowing yourself to slowly recharge. 

Issues will present themselves as we continue to venture down the stream. Besides being unpopular with students, schools across the world grapple with students who have to battle frequent internet issues or no internet access at all. Since attendance is managed through Google Meet sessions, many students could risk receiving an unexcused absence. This issue could sink students down into an unnecessary spiral of stress. 

From my observations, many students cannot adjust to online learning as well as some others, as they shine through in their education by being in front of a teacher. For instance, my brother is able to soak up more information, and perform with a surplus of efficiency in a normal brick and mortar setting. 

Academia is changing more rapidly in this unconventional time, mostly for the better. But that does not mean we turn a blind eye to the potential set of issues that will emerge. In 2020 it’s live and die by the sword. 


Genevieve Turner

Sports Editor

A FID (flexible instruction day) day is a better option in the long run for students. While one might complain in the moment about having to do school work on a snow day, in the long run, it will save students time for summer break because there is no need to make up missed snow days. I diligently complete my work as well as manage my time, there should be no reason that others can’t do the same so they can also enjoy the snow day as well. 

Currently, while the world is in an unconventional time, many schools will still opt to do FID days on what would have been a snow day. These days help further education by there not being a gap between learning times. They also help with keeping spring break as long as it possibly can be because there is no need to make up snow days. The same is with the end of the school year. 


Shana Carey

Opinions Editor and Marketing Editor

Living in Pennsylvania, snowy days are far from over, but school districts across the nation are creating flexible instruction days in order to keep students’ minds sharp. 

After hearing Tuesday afternoon that I did not have to get up at 6 a.m.  the next day due to impending weather, I was jumping with joy, but tomorrow’s workload quickly set me straight. 

After nearly 10 straight hours of working, I found myself with assignments still due in just about every single one of my classes. Going into Thursday, I had to attend Google Meets with my classes in addition to my usual hybrid workload. Over the course of two days, I found myself busier than I have ever been in my entire life. 

Working remotely turned snow days from quality childhood memories to a major migraine. Sure, it’s nice to not have to make days up in the Summer, but there is something to be said about taking a day off and having an extreme snowball fight with a hot chocolatey prize.

“Solo Leveling” — a Webtoon Review

Reflection: How a fantasy webtoon captured the grimy reality of our world

By Max Vigue

Multimedia-Content Editor 

As content online continues to spread across the internet, media such as comics and manga have blown up across the digital landscape. Webtoons can trace their origins back to the early 2000s. It was a niche style of comics similar to manga that was not that well known. Unlike it’s Japanese counterpart, it tended to be in full color and a lot shorter.  

Solo Leveling is a Korean manhwa (webnovel) written by Chu-gong, art created by Gi So-Ryeong and Jang Song-Rak, and published by D’and C Media. It is distributed in English by Webnovel and Tappy-Toons.
It is a fantasy action Webtoon, following our main character Sung Jin Woo. The setting takes place in a reality similar to ours, however mysterious objects known as “gates” start appearing. 
Along with people across the planet undergoing a process known as “awakening”, in which they gain superhuman abilities. These people become “Hunters”, forming organizations known as “guilds” to traverse the dungeons which lie beyond the gate. 

Sung Jin Woo is the weakest Hunter in this world, and often undergoes lots of self-torment. He perceives himself as worthless due to his status. But after a near death experience, in a failed dungeon raid, he experiences a “reawakening” in which a Hunter’s power is either amplified, or completely changed.

However, in a rare occurrence, Jin-Woo only morphs into more of an anomaly when his power is aided by an unknown otherworldly force from where the secrets of the gates lie. His power is the ability to continuously get stronger or level up, through this outside force referred to as “the system”.  
In the course of this story, we see the progression of Sung Jin-Woo from a low E-class hunter, to becoming the renowned Shadow Monarch. 

I really think this story is not a new idea, but a refined take on the power fantasy trope. In most mainstream franchises such as Avengers, Dragon Ball, and Star Wars, we see our heroes build their power from the ground up. 

They use this power to protect the ones around them after a traumatizing event. But these motives, while believable, don’t fully capture the more gritty reality of what a normal person might become in those situations. 
In stories like Attack on Titan, the protagonist goes through a traumatizing event which shakes him to the core. But through the course of the story, we see him change as his black and white perception of the world is shifted by the grey nature of reality. 

A similar approach is taken with this story. The main character originally saw things through a very simplistic moral compass. Due to the nature of his circumstances, requirements that need to be met by the system, and the nearly almost impossible situations he must overcome, his psyche and mindset gradually change over time into a more gritty but realistic doctrine. 

What makes Solo Leveling stand out among emerging webtoons is not only just its sleek art and fast-paced action, but also its primary narrative enchants the viewer, wrapping the audience into the setting. 
Solo Leveling is a story primarily focused on providing an entertaining tale, while at the same time giving an introspective commentary on the human condition and how the world can’t be seen through a tinted glass.  
Solo Leveling is a webtoon that I recommend to any high school student and adults, as this is an M-rated (16 and Up) series. But the story will have you addicted. This is the kind of story that will have you on edge. You will most likely binge-read this series, potential reading the first 30 chapters in one sitting. It has an immersive narrative, adrenaline-packed action sequences, and very modern but satisfying art. 
Solo Leveling Art created by Gi So-Ryeong and Jang Song-Rak
Solo Leveling Art created by Gi So-Ryeong and Jang Song-Rak

Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research.

Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use

Social media creates conflicts about Covid-19 coping skills

By Emily Ankers

Editor-in-Chief

During times of crisis or struggle, it isn’t uncommon to see people using social media in order to deal with the strong emotions they are feeling. With the drastic change in everyday life caused by Covid-19, more and more people have been swarming different social media sites to address their frustrations. 

  Among those using social media to reach out to loved ones and bring attention to their concerns during this trying time are those using social media to make jokes and entertaining content about the pandemic surrounding them. This behavior raises the question of whether or not what these people are doing is harmful or if it is a way of coping with the changes in life.

  In many of these social media posts that are meant to be jokes or to entertain, a common theme is to state that they are ready to contract the virus or to make fun of those who are taking the virus seriously. These behaviors could be viewed as insulting to those afflicted with the virus or those who are frontline workers.

  However, the majority of those posting this type of content are from generations rooted in dark or offensive humor as a way to cope with situations they cannot control or that frighten them. It is important to remember that the actions on social media do not always reflect a person’s true character. Most often, those on social media create a persona and act differently than what is normal for them in order to look a certain way. 

The times we are in are difficult for everyone to adjust to and cope with. While some may view the content being shared as immature and ignorant, it can also be viewed as a coping mechanism. The posts and content created is often for entertainment and allows for individuals to feel connected to one another through a shared sense of humor or belief.

The content being consumed by individuals worldwide is sharing a unique story that everyone can relate to because everyone is experiencing it. While the humor may not fit everyone’s taste, it allows a distraction for a moment from the struggles each individual is facing.

Instead of relying on social media to vent your frustrations during these times, there are many alternatives to try. Some of these alternatives include journaling in a private diary, meditating, screaming into your pillow, or binge-watching a favorite show or movie to distract yourself.

Graphic by Flickr portrays some of the primary social media sites being used at this time. These sites are often where the content is being shared among millions.
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