Author Archives: The Leonid

Hiking taught me to be more environmentally conscious

Shana Carey

Opinions Editor and Marketing Editor

If there’s one thing that the pandemic taught me, it’s that I am not the kind of person who can be cooped up in a room all day. 

When Governor Wolfe established the first set of quarantine restrictions, I eventually grew tired of staring at my bedroom walls, and it became apparent that I had to do something for my own sanity. 

So what do you do when you have a strong desire to leave your bed and get off TikTok, but a pandemic is stopping you from doing so? For me, the answer was hiking. 

I can proudly say that I walked nearly every trail in York County within the matter of one month. Quarantine wasn’t so bad because I was constantly moving and experiencing new places. 

This newfound love of the outdoors came with a price, though. I now see the mistreatment of our environment as an increasingly important problem. 

I first noticed how prominent litter is in the modern world when I was attempting to get a bird’s nest out of my dryer shaft. Apprehensive that I would see an innocent bird carcass, I peaked down the tube to find something far worse. 

A weak-looking nest held together with a long green string of plastic stared right back at me. 

Not only did human development force this bird to use a dryer shaft as a sanctuary, but the bird  was also reduced to constructing a home made of litter.

At this moment, I realized that waste directly affects the animals living in our environment right now. 

People are so desensitized to pollution because it does not immediately affect them. It’s easy to throw a paper bag on the ground and never see it again because ittering doesn’t instantly hurt litterers. 

But it does directly influence this generation of mammals while leaving long term negative effects on the sanctity of our planet. 

With a world that is covered in concrete, it’s easy to feel pretty isolated from the natural world. For this reason, littering and depletion of natural resources seem like distant problems that will never affect us. 

Environmental issues affect everyone.

Next time, you are on a walk around Red Lion, look around. 

On my 0.125 mile walk from the parking lot into the school, I saw nine pieces of garbage. Of those nine pieces of garbage, five were disposable masks, one was a half-full Fanta bottle, there were two disposable forks, and a plastic bag entrapped by a tree’s grasp. 

When you aren’t looking for it, a plastic bag trapped in a tree branch isn’t that incredible to look at. The sad thing is, it isn’t that unordinary either. 

According to the Department of Environmental Protection, an estimated 502 million pieces of litter scatter Pennsylvania roads. 

This explains why I am met with several new pieces of garbage on the ground each time I go outside. 

Now that I’m an avid hiker, every time I see a piece of garbage on the ground, it feels like a personal attack.

Problems fill the world to the brink, but this one resonates with me because humans are doing it to themselves. We are knowingly depleting our natural resources and harming our environment but continue to make few efforts to fix the problem.

So what should we do? Boycotting big corporations or passing Congressional laws are all really great ideas, but they seem like radical solutions. The only way to improve this whopping environmental problem is if every single person sacrifices a little convenience in their lives.

This means carpooling to school, turning off unnecessary lights, throwing trash in the appropriate areas, conserving your water intake, recycling, and even going to thrift stores. 

I recently made a vow to purchase all of my clothes from thrift stores in order to reduce the amount of clothing in landfills. 

Many people don’t know that manufacturing new clothing uses a tremendous amount of energy and water. However, thrifting is a useful tool to conserve natural resources and reduce water intake. Not to mention, the clothes are super cute and cheap.

Not only do I enjoy thrifting, but I also started a garden in order to avoid pesticide-infested veggies. Making this environmentally conscious choice has helped me to stimulate growth in my backyard and create a sanctuary for snails, caterpillars, and other little creatures. 

Everyday environmental actions allow me to reduce my carbon footprint. Making the decision to be environmentally conscious didn’t  inconvenience me that much, but it will have lasting positive effects on the environment. 

If everyone makes a small change in their life to be more environmentally conscious, then this giant environmental crisis will slowly diminish. 

The thing is – I want to enjoy hiking throughout my adulthood. I want to go swimming in a lake that isn’t heavily polluted. I want to walk 0.125 miles without seeing a piece of garbage. 

And it all starts by putting litter in its place. 

Local Food pantry serves families as Red Lion’s poverty rate increases

Shana Carey

Opinions Editor and Marketing Editor

Roughly two out of five students in a Red Lion classroom are in poverty. The poverty rate in the Red Lion Area School District has continuously increased and hit an all time high of 43% this year. In order to combat this growing number, a local food pantry both educates and serves nearly 350 families from Red Lion and also Dallastown and Eastern York school districts. 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, local poverty rates have increased, and more families turn to Community REACH for financial assistance, life skills training, and food and clothing distribution. “It’s definitely increased. I’d say at least 25%,” Executive Director Mrs. JoEllyn Hynson said. ”Every month the numbers keep increasing.” 

Despite the growing poverty rates within the district, the Community Kids Food for Home Program is seeing a decrease in number of families registered. “We’re serving about 25 kids, but usually only about 10 families,” Red Lion Area School District Social Worker Mrs. Brandy Shealer said, “Before, we were serving hundreds of kids.” 

The decrease in families that are registered could be due to the availability of food during the pandemic., “Even students who weren’t on free and reduced lunch are now getting free lunches and free breakfasts.”  Mrs. Shealer said.

The intent behind this program was to make sure that all students got enough food to eat while they are not in school. “For the sake of argument, say we typically have 6,000 students,” Mrs. Shealer said. ”If you think that 40% of that 6,000 are actually in poverty, think how many students we should be serving in this program and we’re not.” 

Families that need to sign up for the program should contact Brandy Shealer or Stacy Strausbaugh directly. Starting in April, all new families can also go directly to the Community REACH website. Anyone that contacts one of these people and is already on free and reduced lunch in Skyward is added to the program. 

In the past few years, there have been many changes to the Community Kids Food for Home Program. “We decided to change the way that we distribute the food and have the parents pick it up,” Mrs. Shealer said, ”so that we could provide larger sizes, and more foods that the families could actually use.”

Parents that are a part of the program have responded positively to this change. “We’ve gotten good feedback from the families that have utilized it,” Mrs. Shealer said. “They were very surprised because we kept telling them, ‘don’t leave yet, we have another box.’”

According to Mrs. Shealer, JoEllyn Hynson at Community REACH helped to supply families with a healthier variety of foods. “We’re very fortunate to have such a wonderful partner in Community REACH,” said Mrs. Shealer. 

At Community REACH, Mrs. Hynson organizes education classes, oversees the pantry, orders the food, gets donations, and targets employees. She is also very excited about starting a baby club where families within the community can access resources for their young children. 

Community REACH serves more than food. They also offer life skills training classes to the public without needing to be a client. “We have people from Penn State come and teach classes and things like that,” Mrs. Hynson said. 

The food pantry’s kitchen was remodeled for cooking classes before the pandemic. However, in person classes are not being held in order to reduce the spread of COVID-19.  “Now, we’re just trying to pick up the pieces and do what we can online,” Mrs. Hynson said. 

This is not the only difference at Community REACH because of the COVID-19 pandemic. “I guess the biggest change is our families are no longer allowed in the pantry,” Mrs. Hynson said. “When the family comes to the door to get the food, we push the card out and they load it up.” 

To register for the food pantry and schedule a time to pick up food, visit https://www.commreach.org/ and click on the Community REACH logo. Any volunteers that are interested in helping the pantry can find more information here

Employee Roberta Dabb, Receptionist Rosemary Thompson, Volunteer Board Member Lori Baker, and Executive Director JoEllen Hynson pose in Community Aid’s educational classroom.

In addition to volunteers, anyone can donate directly to Community REACH. They are looking for baby items, new or dry cleaned clothing items, and food for the Community Kids Food for Home Program. 

The pantry is looking for foods like cereals, pastas, spaghetti sauces, peanut butter, jelly, applesauce, and fruit snack packs. However, Mrs. Shealer said that money is the best way to donate to the program. “You and I might be able to take $1 and get a sale at the grocery store for like two cans,” Mrs. Shealer said, “but Community REACH can access the food banks and they may be able to get 10 cans for $1.”  

The goal of Community Reach is to distribute food, resources, and advocacy within the Red Lion, Dallastown, and Eastern area. “This is where you need to be putting in your efforts because they are directly in our backyard. They’re in our borough,” Mrs. Shealer said. “They’re serving our community, and we need to make sure that we support them.”

Survey shows many Teenagers consume Caffeine daily

By Kaitlyn Resline

Editor-in-Chief

The tired high school student is a troupe played through many novels and movies. The camera zooms in on a student that has just pulled an all-nighter and now has to prepare for school. To make it through the day, the student grabs a cup of coffee on the way out of the house.

The Leonid tested the reality of this troupe in a recent survey about caffeine use.  It turns out, for the majority of those surveyed, caffeine is a real part of their day.

The survey consisted of 408 students at Red Lion Area Senior High School. Freshmen made up 28%, sophomores made up 19.9%, juniors made up 27.3%, and seniors made up 24.8%.

77.7% of students surveyed report that they drink caffeine.

The common types of  caffeine beverages consumed were tea, coffee, energy drinks, and soda. 

“I used to drink coffee because I needed to stay up to do work,” senior Kehnun Sebesta said. “Now I just drink tea because I find it to be more beneficial and less harmful for my body.”

With teens juggling busy schedules and multiple demands at one time, high school students are the fastest growing population of caffeine users, a study conducted by Medical News Today said.

In the study 83.2% of teenagers consumed caffeinated beverages regularly, while at least 96% consumed them occasionally. 

This study was done on a smaller scale than the one at Red Lion, with 166 participants primarily in grades 9 and 10. 

Majority of students in Red Lion reported drinking one to three caffeinated drinks a day while only 9.7% reported drinking four to nine drinks. 

In comparison, the study by Medical News Today “44.6% of respondents drank caffeinated beverages one to six times per week, 11.4% consumed a caffeinated beverage every day, and only 4.8% never consumed drinks containing caffeine.” 

Red Lion student caffeine users are consuming more caffeine than this study.

The Medical News Today study says participants’ main reason for consuming caffeine was to feel alert, which would help them study better.

Similarly, the Red Lion survey found common reasons people drank caffeine was because it tastes good, they wanted to feel more awake, it helped with focus and concentration, and they had to stay up late. 

Mera D’Aquila, a senior at Red Lion, said she drinks caffeine to stay up late and do assignments. She believes it helps her think more clearly when she is only getting four to five hours of sleep a night. 

“Sometimes there will be nights when I have a lot to do,” D’Aquila said. “I’ll tell my mom, ‘can we just please go to Starbucks and get a coffee because I think I’m in the need tonight.’”

D’Aquila thinks she would drink caffeine less if her schoolwork was not so stressful. 

The FDA has cited that 400 milligrams of caffeine a day, or four to five cups of coffee, is not a dangerous amount of caffeine to consume. However, different people have different metabolizing rates of caffeine and respond to the effects differently. 

Common side effects listed by MedlinePlus of consuming too much caffeine includes shakiness, insomnia, headaches, dizziness, rapid heart rate, dehydration, anxiety, and dependency on caffeine. 

Although 80.3% of students report never having any unintended side effects of drinking caffeine, 19.7% report having side effects from caffeine consumption. Among these side effects students listed headaches, shaking, jittering, and nausea. 

Some students said that this happened when they would not consume caffeine for a period of time. 

Caffeine withdrawal can occur when a person consumes caffeine on a regular basis and then suddenly stops. Symptoms of this include headaches, drowsiness, irritability, nausea, and difficulty concentrating. 

The FDA recommends a gradual cut back of caffeine consumption to avoid withdrawal symptoms. If unsure how to do this, a person can talk to their health care provider about how to cut back.

Viewpoint: How the experience of quarantine affected my mental health

By: Laela Thibault

Guest Columnist

Mental health is a serious subject, but it should not be taboo. It is something that everyone deals with, and everyone’s feelings and emotions are completely valid. It tends to be difficult for individuals to come out and talk about their experiences or how they are feeling, but it could be therapeutic for some. 

Even coming out with your own experience could help someone else come out about their mental health as well. Therefore, I would like to share my personal experience. 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, quarantine played a significant role with my mental health. When COVID-19 became a peak issue, it was during my junior year of high school. 

During my junior year, my motivation was low, my sleep patterns were terrible, and my work was not getting done. I was continuously falling into bad habits when it came to school. My grades were getting worse, and I kept getting disappointed at myself. 

I communicated with people I was close to during the school year. I did this in order to be open about my feelings instead of just bottling them up. It was a whole different story when quarantine started though. My mental health was back on a decline.

Considering that my motivation was horrendous while I was in school, absolutely no schoolwork getting completed while I was at home. I felt like I became the worst version of myself, and being isolated with my own thoughts and feelings, I constantly put myself down. 

I started to not sleep at all and I was not taking care of myself like I knew I should.. I stayed in my room, in my bed, and barely spent time with my family. Based on how badly I procrastinated, I almost had to repeat my classes. Fortunately, with the help of my teachers, I was able to pass.

Quarantine during my junior year was a dark, dark period for me but in the end, I still made it through. 

In conclusion, I just want to make it clear that it does end up getting better. Now I am in my senior year, and I am genuinely happy and enjoying myself! 

You should not be ashamed of how you feel because your own feelings are valid and they matter. YOU matter and you can get through any struggle or challenge that comes your way. 

Speak about your own experiences when you are ready because it could help someone else. Opening up more discussion about mental health could make society take it more seriously because it is serious and needs to be talked about. 

Trying to fit in as the new kid

By George Keene                    

Staff Writer

First day of school at Red Lion Senior High school in Red Lion, Pennsylvania, on August 24, 2020. Photo taken by Susan Keene

“My name is George, and I’m new to Red Lion this year.”

I repeat the same line time and again, the only difference is the name of the school I am attending. The feeling of not knowing anybody and anything will never go away.

No matter how many times I am new, I get butterflies in my stomach and a feeling of discomfort and not belonging. I walk into school the first day knowing nothing and no one, hoping to make a friend or two, and not wanting to stick out. 

I have moved around my whole life. I was born in Dubai and have lived in 6 countries across 4 continents. I have attended 3 international schools in Egypt, Malaysia, and most recently, Kenya.

I have also attended 3 public schools ranging across the east coast of the United States and the experience is all but similar.

The experience of being a new student, however, is very different at an international school from a public school.

When I am a new student at an international school, which is an English speaking school overseas with an American curriculum, there are hundreds of other kids just like me, transient kids who are used to the feeling of being new and alone. This makes it easier for new students to fit in, because all the kids have had similar experiences. They know what it is like to be in my shoes.

The main reason as to why it’s easier for me to settle into an international school is because of sports and workshops. The international schools I have attended in my life have had fewer students than Red Lion, and it was easier to make the sports teams, and being on the sports teams helped me make friends.

At the beginning of every year, the schools would also hold new student workshops for all the new students where you could meet the other new students and some students who volunteered to show you around and help you out the first couple weeks. These little things helped me settle in and make friends. On top of that, it was easier to talk to people and relate to them because I had similar experiences as them so it was easier to fit in.

When I am a new student at a public school, nobody is like me. 

There are fewer new kids, and most of the kids have attended school in the same district their entire lives. They don’t know what it’s like to be me, the new kid. At public schools, the main reason it’s harder to settle in than at international schools is the fact that there aren’t the same opportunities to make friends.

The sports teams are harder to make because the level of play is higher and there aren’t any workshops or chances to meet the other new students. You’re thrown into a big pool of fish and have no idea where to go, who to talk to, and who anybody is. Most of the kids have been friends for a long time, because people move around less at public schools. I also am unable to relate to most of the students because we aren’t all that alike. I have seen things they have never seen, like the Pyramids in Egypt. 

As if being a new student isn’t hard enough, COVID-19 made it a whole lot harder. I have always been shy and it’s always been difficult for me to introduce myself to people. So, on top of that fear, I now have to worry about catching this highly infectious disease from my peers around me. In the middle of this mess, however, COVID-19 has given me the opportunity to connect with my old friends peers from all around the world through technology.  

I am a student of the world, even though I am physically located in Red Lion. Some people think that the more you move around and the more times you are a new student, that it gets easier, but it doesn’t.

The feeling of discomfort and not belonging never goes away, but I have learned to take these experiences and make an impact wherever I go, and to learn from those who are around me because their experiences are very different from mine. That’s how you grow and become a student of the world, not just by living across the world, but by meeting people who have and who haven’t.

Change is what makes your experiences as a new student different in international schools compared to public schools. International students understand change and are used to it, while public school students haven’t experienced enough change to feel any way about it and are not used to it. There is nothing wrong with that but that’s what makes our lives unique and difficult, and being a new student in a new country, a new state, a new town, is what makes me, me.

My journey to accept Sri Lanka and America as my home

By Amila Jayamaha

Guest Columnist

America is notorious for being considered a “melting pot.” It’s a country where everyone’s individualities get melted into one large label, “American.” This causes many immigrants to lose their sense of nationalism for their mother country, and makes it even harder for second generation immigrants to have a sense of patriotism for their parents’ home countries. 

I, like the common second generation immigrant, consider America to be my home and chose not to learn about my heritage as a Sinhalese person. However, after many years of discussion with my parents, and some trips to their homeland, I have a newfound appreciation for the country. This allowed me to come to the realization that I am able to consider both America and Sri Lanka to be my home. 

When I was younger my parents used to speak their native language in our house quite often, Sinhalese, and though I understood it well, I would never make any efforts to learn to speak it. I am to this day devastated with that fact. I realized how much I lost by choosing not to invest time in learning about my heritage when I first went to Sri Lanka at the age of 4.

 Throughout the 21 hour plane ride to the country, I was anticipating being extremely underwhelmed entering the country. I assumed all I would want to do would be to count the days till I got to go back home. 

After exiting the airport all of my senses were firing. I would smell the salt from the sea, feel the humid wind on my skin, taste the moisture in the air, and see and hear a bustling city in front of me. Needless to say, I was surprised by how excited I became when seeing the country for the first time. 

The drive to my grandparents home was the most fascinating and scary experience of my life. While I was able to look out the windows and see the large green mountain ranges where rice, tea, and other vegetables were growing. 

Driving in Sri Lanka is very scary, the yellow lines in the center of the road are a mere suggestion, and to drivers the speed limit is the minimum speed you should go. People race around the road overtaking and honking at one another, men herding cattle would suddenly go into the road causing a traffic jam. While I was terrified, I was also bursting with excitement for what else this country had to offer me. 

My first real outing in Sri Lanka led me to one of the many Buddhist temples scattered around the country. I was pleasantly surprised as to how interesting the history was at the temple. The large curved walls were painted with Buddha’s story of enlightenment and there were many statues of different monks and animals around the floors. 

However, what caught my eye the fastest was the 25 foot long sleeping Buddha statue made entirely out of gold, which I later found out was made over 1000 years ago. Hearing this story made me realize the historical value of Sri Lanka. After researching different aspects of Buddhism, I chose to convert to the religion. I had many supporters in the matter, because many of my family, including my mother are Buddhist.

 The next prominent trip I went on was climbing Sigiriya. This mountain stands over 1000 feet tall, and I had little to no support climbing up. While there are railings and stairs now, when I climbed the mountain, there were only steep rock paths that had no railings to catch you if you slipped. 

This added to my sense of adventure while in Sri Lanka, because while the trek was difficult, the view at the top of the mountain was amazing. Atop the mountain was the ruins of an old castle built by a Sri Lankan king who was afraid his brother, who he had pushed out to India, would come back to kill him. Thus, in his paranoia, he built the castle and created an irrigation system in the mountain that would allow him to flood the land in a 60 mile radius to keep invaders out. 

The stories this country had were so fascinating to my young brain, that it helped me learn to appreciate my culture. 

To this day, I continue going on annual summer trips to Sri Lanka to visit friends and family, and see different temples. I have begun learning to speak Sinhalese as well, so that I may someday be able to go to the country alone and experience a new sense of freedom in my motherland. 

After setting up a dual citizenship, I have finally accepted America and Sri Lanka to be my home and hope to embrace the culture that both countries offer. 

Attack On Titan: Breaking the wall of First Impressions

From Thriller to Commentary: How a series evolved into a display of the Human condition

By Max Vigue

Multimedia-Content Editor  

Hajime Isayama’s manga series later turned animated show in 2013 (directed by Tetsurō Araki, Masashi Koizuka, Jun Shishido, and Yūichirō Hayashi) Attack On Titan has accumulated a wide spectrum of popularity. 

 It made waves with a debut in the East and nearly became a classic comparable to Game of Thrones in the West, it streams on streaming services such as CrunchyRoll and Netflix.

Attack On Titan is a show that can capture the attention of mainstream American.  Season 4 will be adapting the later sections of the manga, developing beyond the initial premise. 

Although Wit Studio (April 7, 2013-July 1, 2019) has built up the reputation of releasing these breathtaking adaptations, Mappa (December 7-Present, February 2020), which is known for its mosaic animation, now has taken the reins for finishing this saga.
 
Despite the mixed feedback, audiences are becoming more accustomed to Mappa’s unique style of blending 2D animation with CGI. 

For a quick recap of the initial premise, Attack On Titan is set in a world where humanoid giants referred to as Titans roam the countryside of Paradis Island. 

In response the people of the island built walls to protect themselves from the Titans; Thus enduring over nearly over centuries of peace until one day, a large Titan, referred to as the Colossal Titan, broke down the first wall. 

With one of the walls, Wall Mira, broken down, the people of Paradis [sic] lost 70% of their territory. After retreating into Wall Rose, Eren Yeager (MC) swore revenge on the Titans to one day wipe them all out. Beyond the initial storyline, the show has evolved to become a much more complex narrative.
This series has always held a reputation for its stellar animation. Even after being taken under the wing of Mappa, it still maintains its aesthetic. For instance, The choreography of the action scenes throughout the course of the show have always been executed well. Each movement is animated smoothly, each shot is detailed and meticulously placed. When incorporated into the full sequence, an adrenaline-fueled experience is blasted on screen. 

Mappa has also added another layer of depth to the series by uzliting rotoscoping technology. Rotoscoping really plays into the series’ gritty aesthetic of realism, allowing dialogue-heavy episodes come off as intensely introspective.   

Attack On Titan, on its debut, was perceived as an action-packed roller coaster, showcasing a simple tale of man-eating beasts overtaking human civilization. But over time it has presented itself as a case study analyzing the human condition as a whole. 

The story makes the audience realize that the world does not function under a hero’s journey plot. Every single character has their own reasoning for why they set course on a certain path. 

All the conflicts are sparked due to difference in agendas, colliding with each other like atoms. No one will be willing to budge. Yet Isayama constructed the architecture of the story to make us feel empathy for all sides. 

Even characters that were considered antagonists have their backgrounds explored in depth, conveying a message that even antagonists are still just humans in this world.  
Protagonist Eren Yeager, throughout the course of the story comes to these realizations. At first he is hell-bent on wiping out everyone of one of the Titans ,seeing anyone who stands in his way as an enemy who is completely faceless. But the world forces him to evolve. 

The more he learns about the truth of the Titans, about what the world out the walls is really like, and that some of his allies were actually his enemies the whole time, his perspective evolves.  He is able to sympathize with his enemies and even conclude that they are the same people. He, however, comes to another realization: In this world you can’t stop out of pity or you’ll never be able to achieve your goals. 

So despite his broadened perspective, he knows that he can’t abandon his overall objective. At the end of the day, even though his enemies might be the same in terms of situation, pain, and upbringing he still pushes forward. He will have to take them out by any means in order to achieve his goals. 
Isayama’s once obscure dystopian action manga has evolved to become a commentary for the human condition in animated form. 

Despite still starting off as a series an individual could enjoy for its action,it has transformed into a very thought-provoking work that will make Attack On Titan stand out, regardless of the studio behind it or its specific adaptations.  

I would recommend this series to anyone who not just enjoys well-paced fight scenes, enjoys drama heavy plot, or introspective character arcs.

 All those factors are just a surplus in the larger scheme of this story. It’s the world building, compelling themes, thought-provoking story telling, tear-jerking moments and overall spirit of the show as a whole which makes Attack On Titan unique. 

This show is a must watch for anyone, regardless of demographic. It doesn’t matter if you enjoy anime as a medium or not, the quality makes Attack On Titan a must-watch. 
Artwork created and Distributed by MAPPA Studio

Manga written and illustrated by Hajime Isayama

Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research.

Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Win Against Northeastern Propels Lions into Delayed Season

By Genevieve Turner

Sports Editor

Last night as Red Lion faced Northeastern in the second game of the season it set a different tone than in years past. Stands stood nearly empty as the referee blew the whistle to start the game. 

While there were few fans to cheer on the Lions, the team played with fervor, not unlike years past, the night ended with a score of 53-36. 

Red Lion Varsity came in strong keeping a steady lead over Northeastern. At the end of the first quarter, Red Lion led 16-7, and at half-time, 23-19. By the end of the third quarter, Red Lion led 35-28.

Standout players included senior forward Davante Dennis, the high-scorer, with 18 points on the nigh.  Junior forward Mason Urey scored a total of 13 points.

The game ended with Red Lion emerging victorious.

JV began strong with four points in under four minutes. From there they continued their streak. At half-time Red Lion lead 24 -19. Red Lion kept up their lead in the third quarter but was neck and neck with Northeastern in the fourth quarter.

With 12.5 seconds left, both teams were tied at 40 points. At 6.0 seconds Northeastern gained 4 more points allowing them to take the lead 44-40. 

In the end, Red Lion JV lost 44-40 against Northeastern Senior High. 

Governor Wolfe announced a delay of the start of winter sports practices and games Dec. 13 as COVID-19 cases rose in Pennsylvania.  

Signs in the gym remind anyone at the events to wear a mask and practice social distancing.  Players are required to wear masks as well. Spectators are not allowed to attend.  They can watch events as they are live-streamed.

After resuming the season Jan. 4, winter sports are in full swing. Boys and girls basketball had their first game and scrimmage Jan. 8. The boys won their game. Wrestling had their first match Jan. 10, leaving them 3-2 overall. 

Upcoming home games include girls’ and boys’ basketball against William Penn Jan. 15. The wrestling team has a match against Dover High School Jan. 14. Also, the swimming team has a meet against Central York Jan. 21.

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